23 | Exhibit Revisit - The Family of Man

23 | Exhibit Revisit - The Family of Man

In this new series, I’ll examine an exhibit that’s had a lasting impression on art history. Maybe it galvanized a movement or maybe it was too radical for its time. Whatever the outcome – the decisions made, the artists included or excluded – brought us to where we are today. We’re starting off with “The Family of Man” at the MoMA in 1955. The highest attended photography exhibit in history. 



Edward Steichen Preparing for the exhibit at MoMA, 1955

Edward Steichen Preparing for the exhibit at MoMA, 1955


You thought I was joking? Link to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on image.

You thought I was joking? Link to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on image.


Links / articles mentioned

Dr. Fred Turner - The Family of Man and the Politics of Attention in Cold War America

Watch Dr. Fred talk about the exhibit! If you don't want to read the article.

David Gonzalez - A 'Family of Man' Reunion - LENS - New York Times

The Family of Man - MoMA website (all the original documentation for the exhibit)

Steichen Collection - The Family of Man - at Clervaux Castle 

Timeline of the Doomsday Clock - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 

Alise Tīfentāle - The Photography Exhibition that Everybody Loves to Hate - FK Magazine (I struggled over including this link. There are some factually inaccurate statements in this article. However, Tifentale does a good job at pointing out what modern Indian photographers were creating at the same time as this exhibit. I think it's worth reading for the reminder that Steichen and team did not fairly represent all cultures.) 

Neeta Satam - As Alessio Mamo, World Press Photo face backlash, focus should be on ridding photography of colonial gaze - First Post (good context of why western depictions of other countries should be questioned)

24 | Public vs Private - how museums are made

24 | Public vs Private - how museums are made

22 | Anila Quayyum Agha - the power of dialogue

22 | Anila Quayyum Agha - the power of dialogue